The #1 Issue is Stress and How to Take Steps to Manage Stress

Everyone who has ever held a job has, at some point, felt the pressure of work-related stress. Any job can have stressful elements, even if you love what you do. In the short-term, you may experience pressure to meet a deadline or to fulfill a challenging obligation. But when work stress becomes chronic, it can be overwhelming — and harmful to both physical and emotional health.

Unfortunately such long-term stress is all too common. In 2012, 65 percent of Americans cited work as a top source of stress, according to the American Psychological Association’s (APA) annual Stress in America Survey. Only 37 percent of Americans surveyed said they were doing an excellent or very good job managing stress.

A 2013 survey by APA’s Center for Organizational Excellence also found that job-related stress is a serious issue. More than one-third of working Americans reported experiencing chronic work stress and just 36 percent said their organizations provide sufficient resources to help them manage that stress.

What are the main signs of stress in the workplace?

  • Physical symptoms include:
  • Fatigue.
  • Muscular tension.
  • Headaches.
  • Heart palpitations.
  • Sleeping difficulties, such as insomnia.
  • Gastrointestinal upsets, such as diarrhoea or constipation.
  • Dermatological disorders.

Start with understanding your situation and then get some support.

Track your stressors. Keep a journal for a week or two to identify which situations create the most stress and

  • how you respond to them. …
  • Develop healthy responses. …
  • Establish boundaries. …
  • Take time to recharge. …
  • Learn how to relax. …
  • Talk to your supervisor. …
  • Get some support.

Accepting help from trusted friends and family members can improve your ability to manage stress. Your employer may also have stress management resources available through an employee assistance program (EAP), including online information, available counseling and referral to mental health professionals, if needed. If you continue to feel overwhelmed by work stress, you may want to talk to a psychologist, coach, mentor or clinical hypnotherapist, who can help you better manage stress and change unhealthy behavior.

Change unhealthy behavior

Doing this is one of clinical Hypnotherapy’s great accomplishments, especially, when performd by a skilled storyteller and in a relaxing, soothing and ceremonial environment.

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